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Château de Vauvenargues opened May-Sept

14 May
Château de Vauvenargues

Château de Vauvenargues

The Château de Vauvenargues is to be opened to the public between May and September in conjunction with the Picasso-Cézanne which is hosted at the Musée Granet in Aix-en-Provence.

Pablo Picasso’s burial site opened to public – Telegraph.
By Jon Bryant in Aix-en-Provence

The French château where Pablo Picasso is buried is to be opened to the public for the first time, 35 years after his death.

The Spanish artist was buried in the grounds of a château that he bought on a whim in 1958 in the village of Vauvenargues in the south of France.

Picasso’s 17th Century Chateau Opens To The Public : Wicked Good Travel Tips.
The grand chateau will welcome pre-reserved tours from May 25th until September 27, seven days a week.  Small groups of 18 will be hosted by a guide with entry each half hour.  Tours will visit Picasso’s suite of private rooms including the diningroom, bedroom, bathroom (with Picasso’s painted wall above the tub), and of course his studio.  Picasso and his wife Jacqueline have been laid to rest at the foot of the main steps on the terrace.  Tickets can be purchased for 7.70 euros at the Aix en Provence Tourist Board and the Granet Museum.

A Summer of Picasso | Travel News from Fodor’s Travel Guides.

May 27th will mark the first day the public will be admitted to Picasso’s Château de Vauvenargues, which lords it over a tiny village of the same name.

Once inside, visitors will be able to view a suite of Picasso’s private rooms. These will include his bedroom and bath (on whose walls he painted a mural of a faun), and, most pointedly, his studio, which has been left exactly as it was, down to the last errant splatter of paint.

If you’ve ever dreamt of making a pilgrimage to Picasso Country, this is your year.

With newly granted access to the grave of the father of 20th century art, art lovers everywhere are already making plans to pay their respects.

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Posted by on May 14, 2009 in France

 

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